Guest Column: Five Albums That Will Change You By Moonloop

Column Guest

In our ongoing series of guest columns, we’ve asked a bunch of metal’s heaviest hitters to provide us with a list of five crucial albums they think will change you — either for the better or the worse. Today, we hear from the entire band Moonloop, whose music can be heard here and ordered here.

After a futile attempt to achieve a common list of only five records for the whole band, we decided to pick one album each and agreed on one that has made the most impact on us all.

Death — Human
Human introduced me to the amazing world of technical Death Metal when I was a teenager. The sound, the song structures, the melodies and the whole concept of the album spread a unique magic that can’t be compared to any record of its era. Chuck knew how to challenge himself on every record he wrote, and without doubt Human was the beginning of a new period for extreme metal. He included new and fresh elements that came from other musical styles and, thanks to him, Death Metal took a particular evolution. — Eric Baule

Pantera — Vulgar Display of Power
Energy, melody and strength took a perfect mixture on this album. A wide range of vocal styles and amazing instrumental parts played like no one ever had done before. Vulgar Display of Power is still an amazing piece of work that influenced a whole generation. The entire album is like an electric bath, full of personality and attitude; a fucking classic by one of the top metal bands of the 90s. — Juanjo Martín

Dream Theater — Change of Seasons
In 1995, I used to play a shabby guitar that I got from exchanging a games console. In autumn of the same year, Change of Seasons was released and changed my life as a musician. While the covers were great, what was more impacting was the title track; a journey full of atmospheres and unbelievable instrumental performance. Awesome rhythm patterns and drum breaks from another planet filled those 23 minutes and made me practice them with a pair of ceramic bongos. Mike Portnoy’s playing inspired me to pick up the drums and build my own style that got inspiration from many musical genres although always remaining on the metal side. — Raúl Payán

Moonsorrow — Viides Luku – Hävitetty
The tracks on this album represent what is my mental picture of pure epicness. It leads you to join Moonsorrow’s Finish battle with its perfect blend of progressive, traditional and extreme metal music. An album with two half-hour tracks, introducing and intersecting motifs that combine different instrumentation and character, creating a wide palette of tonal landscapes. The perfect construction of Folk Metal from its foundations, letting a long time pass to achieve climax with bells, choirs and harmony changes, deconstructing then all in an awesome lesson of musical dynamics. — Vic A. Granell

Meshuggah — Obzen
Maybe it was easier to pick one common metal album for the band than five of them. Obzen incredibly opened our minds as musicians and composers and got us addicted to it. While we knew Meshuggah from way before then, the whole album dragged us to a rhythmical complexness that has had a great influence on Moonloop’s writing process. Addictive from beginning to end (don’t dare to miss “Dancers to a Discordant System!”), its tracks fell on us like the culmination of a concept of the band’s own, even after having spread it for years.

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About Chris Harris

Chris Harris is an internationally-published music journalist and writer whose work has appeared on the pages of Rolling Stone, IFC, Revolver, Alternative Press, and Radar. The former news editor for Noisecreep, Harris also served as co-host for the site’s weekly podcast, “Creep Show." Before that, he spent four years writing for MTV News.