Ex-Judas Priest Guitarist Explains Why He Bounced

K.K. Downing

In short, he didn’t enjoy doing it anymore.

Yes folks, former Judas Priest guitarist Kenneth “K.K.” Downing says in a new interview he didn’t want to quit, but also wasn’t having any fun either.

“I’ll never get away from this retirement thing, but what happened was that I quit,” Downing explains. “Retired implies that I am not physically able to do it. I am able to do it, but I didn’t want to do it; I just wasn’t enjoying it anymore.”

Damn. Well, seems a good enough reason.

“A lot of things had changed. I think I counted about thirty reasons why I didn’t want to do it at the time, and that is an awful lot of reasons,” says K.K.

“In all honesty, I think that in so many respects it had run its course. If you’re part of a songwriting team, you get the recognition and reward for creating something, but for me, Priest became about going out and playing live and replicating exactly what people had enjoyed ten, twenty or thirty years ago.

“The fans would be just as happy if they could see us bin all of the modern guitars we now play and take them on a walk down memory lane, because I think that’s what people enjoy most. And I understand that, because if I could go out now and see Eric Clapton with Cream, then I would be the happiest person in the world.”

He continues: “One of the beautiful things about being in the industry was the ability to continue to invent and create, constructing songs and making good records. You do feel the need to be creative, and that was taken away with the downloading thing, and as you get older, the balance of the scales starts to tip. So if you can’t be creative, why would you want to continue to dedicate the time into something?

“I suppose if the industry was still healthy and people still had to spend their hard-earned money buying a record, it would be different, but if you give something away, then it has no value.

“We used to buy an album and think, ‘Well, it’s not that good, but I’ll play it a million times [and] I’m sure I’ll get into it, and now it doesn’t really get a second chance.

“In the past, there was always the opportunity to create a record like Dark Side Of The Moon or British Steel or Back In Black that would be one of those albums that would be indelible and people will always come back to. And I think that opportunity has gone now, and I think it would take a miracle for one of those to happen again.

“If you consider an album like Nostradamus, then if that had been released in 1978, then it would have been another Dark Side Of The Moon, but it is all about the timing.

“When you think about it, in the early days, we had the opportunity to write great songs, play great solos and have great vocal performances, but people get used to it and it is hard now to get the reaction of, ‘Wow, have you heard the new Priest album?’

“The industry has changed so much… I see companies that are repackaging and rehashing, and that started happening to us, and that was not a pretty thing to be a part of. It’s kind of duping the fans a bit, because there are fans around the world that have got to have everything to complete their collection, so even if there are only a few thousand of them, if you put out a box collection, it might be $100, which is a lot of dollars, and so for me, that is something that I didn’t get into music for.”

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About Chris Harris

Chris Harris is an internationally-published music journalist and writer whose work has appeared on the pages of Rolling Stone, IFC, Revolver, Alternative Press, and Radar. The former news editor for Noisecreep, Harris also served as co-host for the site’s weekly podcast, “Creep Show." Before that, he spent four years writing for MTV News.

  • P-ST0LER0

    File-sharing killed the rock star and that sucks- I bought the latest Judas Priest “Epitaph” video apprehensively because KK wasn’t in it. I wish he’d at least played in that one a last time.